Green__Willow (green__willow) wrote,
Green__Willow
green__willow

Asterism Soaps shop is now live!

Tags: business, etsy, soap
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Oh wow, these are lovely!

teaforme

February 22 2015, 18:31:59 UTC 2 years ago Edited:  February 22 2015, 18:42:35 UTC

Agreed--these are gorgeous! Congrats on your new business.
@teaforme

I use the Brambleberry Melt and pour bases. I'd love to get into cold process, which I'd have more control over the ingredients but it takes a bigger setup than I can afford right now.

As to scents, it varies by bar, but I try to use essential oils when I can. I am also happy to take custom orders for colors and scents, but they're a little more expensive because I have to make them singly rather than by the dozen.

I hope to get into the wedding favor business, and do batches of 2-or-3 hundred in a go.

elenbarathi

April 3 2015, 10:31:30 UTC 2 years ago Edited:  April 3 2015, 10:40:10 UTC

Heya, off-topic here: check this out:

Things My Male Tech Colleagues Have Actually Said to Me, Annotated

Some of the comments are also hilarious. I adore The Toast!


Here's Elizabeth Bathory on 'Rejected Princesses'

...and here is the book the author cites as her main information source:

Countess Dracula: Life and Times of Elisabeth Bathory, the Blood Countess by Tony Thorne.

"The case of Elizabeth Báthory inspired numerous stories during the 18th and 19th centuries. The most common motif of these works was that of the countess bathing in her victims' blood to retain beauty or youth. This legend appeared in print for the first time in 1729, in the Jesuit scholar László Turóczi’s Tragica Historia, the first written account of the Báthory case. The story came into question in 1817, when the witness accounts (which had surfaced in 1765) were published for the first time. They included no references to blood baths. In his book Hungary and Transylvania, published in 1850, John Paget describes the supposed origins of Báthory's blood-bathing, although his tale seems to be a fictionalized recitation of oral history from the area. It is difficult to know how accurate his account of events are. Sadistic pleasure is considered a far more plausible motive for Elizabeth Báthory's crimes."

"Báthory was imprisoned in Čachtice Castle and placed in solitary confinement. She was kept bricked in a set of rooms, with only small slits left open for ventilation and the passing of food. She remained there for four years, until her death. On 21 August 1614 in the evening her Ladyship complained to her bodyguard that her hands were cold, whereupon he replied "It's nothing Mistress. Just go lie down." She went to sleep and was found dead the following morning. She was buried in the church of Čachtice on 25 November, but according to some sources due to the villagers' uproar over having "The Tigress of Čachtice" buried in their cemetery, her body was moved to her birth home at Ecsed, where it was interred at the Báthory family crypt. Today´s location of her body is unknown."
~Source